Painting Lutradur

11 10 2011

In the US, they do not have access to the amazing coloured Lutradur we have, so many of the techniques you read about in books and magazines requires you to paint your white lutradur first.  This is something that gives you the flexibility to create whatever colours you want for your projects.  You can paint the coloured Lutradur too.  In both cases, it is very very easy.

The next few photos show me painting about a metre of the heavy weight.

I like to use Dye Na Flow to add colour.  Dye Na Flow is a semi transparent paint, so you can still see the texture of the fibre behind it, you get blends of your different colours in a watercolour, washed sort of finish and the paint does not act as a significant resist to heat sculpting or distorting.

I dilute the paint with water to make it thinner and lighter.  Experiment to get the intensity of hue you are after.  Remember paints go on every surface.   You don’t need to target specific paints to a particular fibre.  Dye Na Flow is a fabric paint, which means that it has a bonding agent of sorts that will lock onto the fibre (not in like dyes) and be colourfast once dry and cured.  Heat setting with an iron or heat gun will escalate the curing process.

Then it really is a matter of slapping the paint on to saturate through the Lutradur.   I always add three colours to pretty much everything I do.  In this case I have used Turquoise, Teal and Purple.  When they blend in you get all sorts of blues with hints of green and violet.  Every piece is different.

Slap on one colour

fill the gaps with the other paints, painting over air bubbles – unless you want a more organic look – then leave the air bubbles alone.  Lutradur is not woven, so it has layers and there are lots of places the air can get trapped in the heavier weight fabrics.  I usually flip it over to check the coverage.

Then hang it on the line or leave it flat to dry.  If you have read this far, I probably should have mentioned at the beginning that it is best to line your table with news paper or plastic and to paint out on the grass.  Paint will dry on your floors or concrete and be permanent – yes even fabric paint.  And that sun thing – it escalates the drying process so take care of how far you a ‘slapping’ the paint and rinse down any spills before they dry.

This painted Lutradur is for my “I Dream of the Sea” classes at the Brisbane Show.  It is the backdrop of the four elements in the sample, one of which is below.  I have shown you this photo before, so forgive the repetition if you have seen it.

 Also in this sample is plain light weight Lutrdur with Transfer Artist Paper transfers and Light weight light Blue Lutradur with Angelina ironed to it and terribly distressed with the heat gun.  This last one is my favourite finish.  The heavy painted Lutradur does not distress with out a lot of heat. Putting paint over it also builds up the layers and acts as a resist.  The thicker the paint the greater the resist.  It takes a bit of persistence to distort this, and maybe you don’t want to.  Fire works but can be a bit dramatic.  A very hot heat gun will also work.  An iron will just sort out creases.

As always, experiment and play.

 

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5 responses

11 10 2011
kate tremul

so happy I am doing that workshop at show with you plus all your other ones
Cecile what is Lutradur ?? I mean what is it’s original form is it from a plant for eg ???
cheers dears
kt n critters xxxx

11 10 2011
uniquestitching

Hi Kate
it is a man made fabric which comes in a number of different weights and forms. In the classes you are enrolled in, you will use a pretty wide cross section and I will talk a lot about what it is, what you can do with it and how to use it.
Cecile

3 11 2011
Alison

Thanks for this information, Cecile. Just wondering if you can actually sew with Lutradur? Could you use it in part of a costume corset style top? (not to be worn, more of an art piece?)
Thanks

3 11 2011
uniquestitching

Hi Alison, yes you can absolutely sew with it. It is very malleable, soft in a firm way, washable and it does not fray. I stitch it into things all the time and even use it as an applique. You could wear it and some of the ladies that did a class with me in Brisbane were going to use the fabrics they made as panels in both jackets and bags.

Cecile

4 11 2011
Alison

Thank, Cecile. Will be buying some soon!

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